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Beastie Boys to Monster Energy Drink: Quit Stealing Our Music!

Group files suit against energy drink maker over illegal use of their music

Beastie Boys

NO SLEEP TILL . . . the bank?

If all goes accordingly, it appears this may very well be the case for the Beastie Boys.

Reps for the New York-based rap trio have filed a suit against energy drink giant, Monster, alleging that “Monster, without plaintiffs’ consent, synchronized and recorded (Beastie Boys music) with visual and other material in the creation of promotional video . . . for Monster products.”

Thumbing through the fine print, the suit specifically refers to unlicensed Beastie Boys material in a clip for Monster’s “Ruckus in the Rockies 2012” snowboarding event held this past May. Also at issue is a Monster promo which included a link to a downloadable free MP3 that contained 23 minutes of music filled with some of the group’s most popular songs.

Now this may be slightly confusing for anyone involved in action sports whose seen videos with a Beastie Boy song or two in the background — that’s actually okay to do by Mike D, Ad-Rock, and the late, great Mr. MCA.

You see, the group has established a sharp distinction between the promotional and artistic use of their music. Skaters, bikers, and boarders have the right to use the music in personal “home-movie” videos to showcase their skills. Using the Beastie Boys’ songs specifically for advertisements, however, is a big no-no.

Especially when it’s without the group’s permission.

As a matter of fact, late Beastie Boys member Adam “MCA” Yauch, who passed away of cancer this past May, actually addressed this issue in his will, stating “in no event may my image or name or any music or any artistic property created by me be used for advertising purposes.”

Sounds pretty clear to the folks here at the world’s best portable mini speaker. Guess it was kind of confusing to the brains in charge at Monster.

Breaking it all down, in their case again Monster, Michael “Mike D” Diamond, Adam “Ad-Rock” Horovitz, and Dechen Yauch (executor of the estate of Adam “MCA” Yauch) are together seeking “no less than $150,000” for each infringement Monster conducted, among other damages.

That’s a lot of Red Bull, but hey, I guess sometimes you just need to fight for your right to protect your $hit.

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