Boombotix Releases the Chronic Edition

Smoked_Out

The Greenhouse effect

I’m happy to announce a limited edition Bot we’ve been working on since this morning over a bowl of cereal.  I would love to tell you what kind of cereal, but I totally don’t want us to get sued.  Let’s just call it ‘Raptain Runch’ and leave it at that.

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750-POUND CANNON FIRES DELICIOUS TACOS 200-FEET

Because this is ‘merica gawd damnit

taco cannon

Boombotix is located in San Francisco’s Mission District where we have taco’s available every two-hundred feet.  Naturally, when I saw this, I realized that the possibility for #nextlevel taco delivery was finally here.  I could literally be sitting at my desk, use Siri to ping the taco cannon, and if my local taqueria could work on their aim, I could have a taco sniped into the palm of my hand.

This taco cannon was built for Fun Fun Fun Festival in Texas.  Are you surprised?  The device was made using a modified t-shirt launcher.  We’re on the hunt for some footage of this taco cannon in action.  If we don’t see anything promising, we may be spending the weekend building some new taco artillery.

Can this do burritos too?

Source: Gizmodo

 

 

The History of the Boombot

Ghetto fab-o-lous skullyboom circa 2009

The original Boombot was conceived as an alternative to headphones. The founder of Boombotix, Lief Storer, was commuting via bicycle to and from work across a mile of traffic and three miles of bayside estuary. He wanted something that would be safer than headphones while also immersing himself in the outdoors with his music. He worked as an engineer by day and an artist by night. When the company flew him to Taiwan to work on LED lighting systems, he discovered Japanese urban vinyl toy design. He began incorporating the toy medium into his work before coming across a Do-it-Yourself toy called the Skully.

The Skully featured asymmetrical eyes in a tennis ball-sized form factor. The toy was made of PVC on a rotocast. Using the shell and some off-the-shelf portable speaker components and a Motorola walkie-talkie belt clip, Lief assembled the first working prototypes. Many of his friends took interest in the product, and a company was beginning to form. Over the next year, Lief spent his off-hours meticulously refining the design to move closer to a satisfactory working prototype. The first production prototypes were tested in rain drenched San Francisco and the deep treacherous powder throughout Lake Tahoe.

By April of 2010, Lief had raised enough private equity and built enough into the design to bring the first Boombots to the market. They were super simple, featuring an on/off button, rechargeable battery, retractable audio cable, and a hip clip.

Count the ways to use a Boombot Speaker

Over the past couple of years we’ve seen so many awesome ways our ultraportable speakers have been used. You can put a boombot on just about anything with it’s wearable clip, and with it’s ruggezed, drop-tested shell you can take it just about anywhere (derp, you already knew that).

We’ve gathered your photos while searching through our Swagonomics and FaceBook pages and compiled the ways you guys use your Boombot. From the extreme chilling to climbing tree tops, yall have done a most excellent job of never missing a beat!!

Check below to see how & where people are using boombot’s all over the world!

chilling in a park

Catching zzz’s in the park while getting tan. Photo cred: tajnihal

vacation with the family

On vacay with the fam! Photo cred: Wheatrick

Mountain biking in the great outdoors!

Mountain biking in the great outdoors! Photo cred: RideSFO

wearable technology

Clip it on your purse like a BOSS. Photo cred: joesavage1988

hungover, tryna function

Hungover attempting to function #yolo !! Photo cred: poppi_d

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Bike Speakers Increase FUN by 14.7X

ride fast with bike speakers and knock that beat

Having an ultraportable speaker enables our crew to have 14.7 times more fun than traditional biking methods. This is a proven fact demonstrated by the Boombotix Institute of Sound. Hit this track by Lunice- Freaky for that new new fresh beat.

Featuring riders including: Jason Clary, Joshua Squeeks, Matt Reyes, Jason Arens, Nikko Jow amongst others.

Filmed on locations in Jack London Square, Oakland, Sutro SF, and the SF Mission District, Panhandle, and Golden Gate Park.